Consortium (2)

 

Project Consortium Coordinator

Josep A. Planell
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC)
Biomedical Research Networking center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials
and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN)

Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Phone: +34 934 039 706
japlanell@ibecbarcelona.eu


Other participating personnel:
Dr. Elisabeth Engel, senior researcher
Dr. Melba Navarro, senior researcher
Dr. Óscar Castaño, senior researcher
Dr. Miguel A. Mateos, senior researcher


Relevant funding organisation: Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII)


Consortium

Project Consortium Coordinator

Josep A. Planell
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC)
Biomedical Research Networking center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials
and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN)

 

Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Phone: +34 934 039 706
japlanell@ibecbarcelona.eu


Other participating personnel:
Dr. Elisabeth Engel, senior researcher
Dr. Melba Navarro, senior researcher
Dr. Óscar Castaño, senior researcher
Dr. Miguel A. Mateos, senior researcher


Relevant funding organisation: Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII)


About the project

nAngioFrac

Angiogenic nanostructured materials for non-consolidating bone fractures

One important strategy in tissue regeneration consists on developing smart tailored scaffolds able to signal and stimulate progenitor cells to colonize them and to activate their natural behaviour that results in the regeneration of new healthy living tissue. Currently, one of the main limitations of present scaffolds is their lack of vascularisation to support both the growth and viability of these regenerated tissues.

Therefore, the development of new angiogenic materials able to trigger new vessels formation and to induce vascularisation is a key issue. In this context, the development of novel biomaterials able to release the right concentration of angiogenesis promoting ions is an innovative, cost-effective and promising strategy to achieve adequate tissue vascularization and regeneration. Osteoconductive biodegradable CaP glasses have the ability to trigger vessels formation. This phenomenon is mainly due to the release of Ca2+ ions which have shown to elicit an angiogenic effect. Therefore, this research project proposes the development of tailored biodegradable and bioactive nanostructured scaffolds that ensure the right Ca release to activate the angiogenic cascade and promote tissue repair in a well defined application: pseudarthrosis, a disease highly dependent on vascularization. In order to achieve this goal, the design, development and characterization of fully inorganic nanostructured porous CaP glass ceramics and (PLA/CaP glass) hybrid nanofibred scaffolds will be carried out. Furthermore, their biological response (both in vitro and in vivo) will be studied for the above mentioned application.

 

Keywords: Nanostructures, biomaterials, angiogenesis, pseudarthrosis, scaffolds, non-consolidating bone fractures, CaP glass ceramics.

Project partner 2

Project partner 2

Malgorzata Lewandowska
Warsaw University of Technology (WUT)

Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw, Poland
Phone: +48-22-234-8399
malew@inmat.pw.edu.pl


Other participating personnel:
Ida Dulinska-Molak, postdoc
Agata Roguska, PhD student


Relevant funding organisation: tbc


nAngiofrac

‘Angiogenic nanostructured materials for non-consolidating bone fractures’ (nAngioFrac), coordinated by Josep Planell’s Biomaterials for regenerative therapies group at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), brings together four other academic, clinical and industrial partners from France and Poland. It aims to develop tailored biodegradable and bioactive nanostructured scaffolds to ensure the correct release of calcium, a major player in angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), to promote tissue repair in pseudarthrosis. This condition results from inadequate healing after a bone fracture and sometimes during development, and results in a ‘false joint’.

One important strategy in tissue regeneration is developing ‘smart’ scaffolds able to stimulate progenitor cells to colonize them and to activate their natural behavior, resulting in the regeneration of new healthy living tissue. Currently, one of the main limitations of present scaffolds is their lack of vascularisation to support the growth and viability of these regenerated tissues. The nAngioFrac consortium will design, develop and characterize fully inorganic nanostructured porous CaP glass ceramics and hybrid (PLA/CaP glass) nanofibre scaffolds, materials able to trigger angiogenesis and induce vascularization due to their release of calcium ions, and study their biological response in vitro and in vivo.